Coatis

Coatis are from the same family as racoons. Our South American Coatis are also known as Ring-tailed Coatis; because of the rings around their tails. Coatis can be found around South America; but they have never been found in Chilean natural habitats.

The Coati in our care eat a mix of fruit, vegetables, nuts, eggs and meats. They are also fed mice and chicks regularly. Coatis are very active creatures and ours go by the names; Chloe and Lucy.

Chloe

4 Years Old(estimated)

Likes/Dislikes

Chloe loves juicy fruit – the sweeter the better. Her favourites are papaya and melon. She’s not a big fan of veggies though!

Lucy

4 Years Old(estimated)

Likes/Dislikes

Lucy loves a good cuddle, she’s a gentle girl who gets scared of loud noises.

Coati Presentation

During our Coati Presentations, our 2 coati show off their athletic abilities, by jumping, climbing and running around happily. They are guided by our professional Animal Carers and are seen enjoying their activities and well-deserved bits of food.

The Coati Presentation will help you understand more about these magnificent Procyonids and give you a few fun facts about their temperament, their natural habitat and the story of our two stars.

Coati Interaction

Every animal Interaction in our Park is special and meeting with the Coati is a memory that you will never forget. These wild creatures are fun, fast and sometimes cheeky. They are always looking for food and will climb all over you to get it.

Luckily, our trainers Animal Carers will guide to and the Coatis to fully enjoy the experience. You will feed the Coatis and be able to touch them and interact with them for 15 minutes.

did you know?
  1. Coatis can reach up to 70 centimetres in total length and 8 kilograms in weight. Males are generally bigger than females.
  2. Coatis have thick fur that covers their entire body. The fur on their top side is generally light brown or black in colour and their underside is usually lighter. They also have white markings on their faces and rings on their tails.
  3. Their long snouts help them to find food under the soil and rocks. They are very good climbers.
  4. Coatis are usually diurnal animals – this means they are mostly active during the day and not that much at night.
  5. Coatis usually live only 7-8 years in the wild while they can live up to 17 years under human care.